2022 Flash Fiction Festival

February 20-26, 2022

Register Now

Join Literary Cleveland virtually online for our second Flash Fiction Festival. Over the course of seven days you will work with some of the best flash fiction writers and editors in the country to draft new pieces, share your work, and learn where and how to publish.

Register for individual programs or sign up for the full conference and save. All programs will take place remotely online via Zoom. Panel discussions will be held in webinar format and will be recorded. Large-group generative workshops will be run in meetings format and will not be recorded. Registration deadline: February 18.

2022 Flash Fiction Festival Schedule

Kickoff Panel Discussion

Sunday, Feb. 20 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

Festival workshop leaders and flash fiction writers Vanessa Chan, Desiree Cooper, Kathy Fish, and Lindsay Hunter will discuss craft, the writing process, and the state of flash fiction today.

Kathy Fish Workshop

The Flash Writer as Mosaicist: Creating Story from Fragments

Monday, Feb. 21 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

“There’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.” ~Leonard Cohen

Variously referred to as fragmented, segmented, or mosaic, flash fiction structured in pieces is a unique and interesting approach. We will read and discuss some published examples of stories using this form, looking particularly at the use of distillation, juxtaposition, imagery, white space, and subtext. We’ll also look at what this form uniquely accomplishes, given the space constraints of the flash form. Then, we’ll write to two generative exercises aimed first at excavating fragments from our own lives, memories, songs, dreams, and images, then arranging those pieces to create an unusual and arresting fragmented flash.

Vanessa ChanWorkshop

The Things We Carry: Generating Flash About Everything We Inherit

Tuesday, Feb. 22 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

This generative workshop will be focused on flash, whether fiction, nonfiction, or the blurred space in between, about all the things we carry and inherit – from genetic material to family stories to trauma to transformative friendships. This class will examine all that is passed on to us – whether via our families or our chosen communities, and how we choose to use what we have inherited. Participants should leave the workshop with one or several beginnings of flash pieces addressing these themes of lineage, inheritance, ancestry, and history.

Lindsay Hunter Workshop

Microplace: Creating a World in Few Words

Wednesday, Feb. 23 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Just because it’s short doesn’t mean a flash piece can’t be deeply realized. Some of the best microfictions feel as if we’re glimpsing an entire world, tangible and fragrant. How do you get your work there? Start, maybe, by focusing on place. In this microplace workshop, we’ll work on locating your work, defining itself amongst its things, its scent, its colors and noises. We’ll complete in-class activities using sense and place, and we’ll even share what we’ve written.


Desiree CooperWorkshop

Flash Is No Joker Is It?

Thursday, Feb. 24 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Writers often look to prose poetry and short stories/essays for guidance on how to write flash. But the bones of flash most resemble the structure of jokes. In this session, we’ll look at the similarities between writing jokes and writing flash and how to steal powerful techniques from humorists. The tools you’ll learn in this session will make your flash (fiction or nonfiction, serious or funny) land like a punch.

Flash Fiction Open Mic

Friday, Feb. 25 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Join host Literary Cleveland to hear writing from your fellow festival participants and to share your own new work.

Editor Roundtable on Publishing

Saturday, Feb. 26 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm ET 

Join the editors of some of the top flash fiction journals in the country to learn what they look for in submissions and how to get your own work published. Editors include Aaron Burch of Hobart and HAD, Scott Garson of Wigleaf, Amy Stuber of Split Lip, and Tara Isabel Zambrano of Waxwing.

Join Literary Cleveland virtually online for our second Flash Fiction Festival. Over the course of seven days you will work with some of the best flash fiction writers and editors in the country to draft new pieces, share your work, and learn where and how to publish.

Register for individual programs or sign up for the full conference and save. All programs will take place remotely online via Zoom. Panel discussions will be held in webinar format and will be recorded. Large-group generative workshops will be run in meetings format and will not be recorded. Registration deadline: February 18.

2022 Flash Fiction Festival Schedule

Kickoff Panel Discussion

Sunday, Feb. 20 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

Festival workshop leaders and flash fiction writers Vanessa Chan, Desiree Cooper, Kathy Fish, and Lindsay Hunter will discuss craft, the writing process, and the state of flash fiction today.

Kathy Fish Workshop

The Flash Writer as Mosaicist: Creating Story from Fragments

Monday, Feb. 21 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

“There’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.” ~Leonard Cohen

Variously referred to as fragmented, segmented, or mosaic, flash fiction structured in pieces is a unique and interesting approach. We will read and discuss some published examples of stories using this form, looking particularly at the use of distillation, juxtaposition, imagery, white space, and subtext. We’ll also look at what this form uniquely accomplishes, given the space constraints of the flash form. Then, we’ll write to two generative exercises aimed first at excavating fragments from our own lives, memories, songs, dreams, and images, then arranging those pieces to create an unusual and arresting fragmented flash.

Vanessa ChanWorkshop

The Things We Carry: Generating Flash About Everything We Inherit

Tuesday, Feb. 22 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET

This generative workshop will be focused on flash, whether fiction, nonfiction, or the blurred space in between, about all the things we carry and inherit – from genetic material to family stories to trauma to transformative friendships. This class will examine all that is passed on to us – whether via our families or our chosen communities, and how we choose to use what we have inherited. Participants should leave the workshop with one or several beginnings of flash pieces addressing these themes of lineage, inheritance, ancestry, and history.

Lindsay Hunter Workshop

Microplace: Creating a World in Few Words

Wednesday, Feb. 23 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Just because it’s short doesn’t mean a flash piece can’t be deeply realized. Some of the best microfictions feel as if we’re glimpsing an entire world, tangible and fragrant. How do you get your work there? Start, maybe, by focusing on place. In this microplace workshop, we’ll work on locating your work, defining itself amongst its things, its scent, its colors and noises. We’ll complete in-class activities using sense and place, and we’ll even share what we’ve written.


Desiree CooperWorkshop

Flash Is No Joker Is It?

Thursday, Feb. 24 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Writers often look to prose poetry and short stories/essays for guidance on how to write flash. But the bones of flash most resemble the structure of jokes. In this session, we’ll look at the similarities between writing jokes and writing flash and how to steal powerful techniques from humorists. The tools you’ll learn in this session will make your flash (fiction or nonfiction, serious or funny) land like a punch.

Flash Fiction Open Mic

Friday, Feb. 25 from 7:00-8:30 pm ET 

Join host Literary Cleveland to hear writing from your fellow festival participants and to share your own new work.

Editor Roundtable on Publishing

Saturday, Feb. 26 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm ET 

Join the editors of some of the top flash fiction journals in the country to learn what they look for in submissions and how to get your own work published. Editors include Aaron Burch of Hobart and HAD, Scott Garson of Wigleaf, Amy Stuber of Split Lip, and Tara Isabel Zambrano of Waxwing.

This festival takes place remotely online via Zoom

Based in Cleveland, OH 44113

Our Instructors

Aaron Burch

Aaron Burch is the author of the memoir/literary Stephen King’s The Body; the short story collection, Backswing; and the novella, How to Predict the Weather. He is the Founding Editor of Hobart, and it's more recent offshoot journals, HAD and WAS (Words and Sports). His first novel, YEAR OF THE BUFFALO, will be published in Fall 2022. He lives in Ann Arbor, MI where he teaches at the University of Michigan.

Vanessa Chan

Vanessa Chan is a Malaysian writer. Her writing has been published or is forthcoming in Kenyon Review, Electric Lit, Ecotone, Best Small Fictions, Joyland, and more. She has received scholarships to the Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and Tin House writers' conferences, and is a fiction editor at TriQuarterly. She co-runs the twenty-year old Pete’s Reading Series in Brooklyn.

Desiree Cooper

Desiree Cooper is a 2015 Kresge Artist Fellow, former attorney, and Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist. Her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, is a 2017 Michigan Notable Book that has won numerous awards. Cooper’s flash fiction has appeared in The Best Small Fictions 2018, Forward: 21st Century Flash Fiction, Electric Literature, River Teeth, The Rumpus, and in the seminal anthology, Choice Words: Writers on Abortion.

Kathy Fish

Kathy Fish’s stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Ploughshares, Copper NickelBest American Nonrequired Reading, Washington Square Review, the Norton Reader, Best Small Fictions, Wigleaf and Norton’s Flash Fiction America (2023). She has published five short fiction collections and teaches a variety of creative writing classes in her own online workshops.

Scott Garson

Scott Garson is the author of IS THAT YOU, JOHN WAYNE?—a collection of stories—and he’s the editor of Wigleaf, an award-winning journal of very short fiction. His work has appeared in/on Threepenny Review, American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Electric Literature, Kenyon Review, and others. He lives in central Missouri.

Lindsay Hunter

Lindsay Hunter is the co-founder and co-host of the groundbreaking Quickies! reading series, an event that focused on flash fiction. She is the author of the story collections Daddy’s and DON’T KISS ME. Her first novel, Ugly Girls, was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in November 2014. Her latest novel, Eat Only When You’re Hungry, was a finalist for the 2017 Chicago Review of Books Fiction Award and a 2017 NPR Great Read.

Amy Stuber

Amy Stubers writing has appeared in The New England Review, Ploughshares, Witness, The Common, Cincinnati Review, West Branch, and elsewhere. Her flash fiction appeared on the Wigleaf Top 50 in 2021, and she was recipient of the 2021 Northwest Review Fiction Prize. She’s co-flash editor for Split Lip Magazine, has a PhD in English, and taught college writing for a decade. She recently completed a first novel and is at work on a second.

Tara Isabel Zambrano

Tara Isabel Zambrano is a writer of color and the author of Death, Desire And Other Destinations, a full-length flash collection by OKAY Donkey Press. Her flash fiction has been published in The Best Small Fictions 2019, The Best Micro Fiction 2019, 2020 Anthology. She lives in Texas and is the Fiction Editor for Waxwing Literary Journal.

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